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This is a rare sight for us! Any guesses as to what it is? ... See MoreSee Less

This is a rare sight for us! Any guesses as to what it is?

Carla Rogers-Stevens, Debbie Daniels and 23 others like this

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Cris WeberDouble Crested Cormorant?

15 hours ago   ·  2
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Laura Nickersondouble crested cormorant

15 hours ago   ·  2
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Paula Newcombimmature cormorant?

15 hours ago   ·  1
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Seán Ó MurchadhaCormorant?

13 hours ago   ·  1
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Irene McIntoshBut are Double Crested cormorants "rare" in your area? We seem to have loads of them up here in Portland. I love their bright blue eyes. The hooked beak - not so much. Quite the weapon to deal with when handling. 🙂

11 hours ago
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Banesto HighlandCormorant.

8 hours ago
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This Common Poorwill was brought to us by a Good Samaritan who was unaware that Poorwills go into torpor. Torpor is a hibernation-like state where they lower their body temperature to preserve energy, sometimes for several weeks! This is important since there are not many insects for them to eat when it is too cold outside. Since Poorwills like to torpor on the ground, they are often found in warehouses and barns appearing non-responsive and cold. Unless you have reason to believe the bird has been injured, it is best to just keep them as safe as possible until they can end their torpor naturally. This one was examined thoroughly and released that same night! ... See MoreSee Less

This Common Poorwill was brought to us by a Good Samaritan who was unaware that Poorwills go into torpor. Torpor is a hibernation-like state where they lower their body temperature to preserve energy, sometimes for several weeks! This is important since there are not many insects for them to eat when it is too cold outside. Since Poorwills like to torpor on the ground, they are often found in warehouses and barns appearing non-responsive and cold. Unless you have reason to believe the bird has been injured, it is best to just keep them as safe as possible until they can end their torpor naturally. This one was examined thoroughly and released that same night!

Heather Witzens, Don Coelho and 23 others like this

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Laura Jane RavenscraftWow never seen this bird in our area! Where was the bird found?

2 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Kathy KrauseI've never seen a bird like this. It looks like dead tree bark or something. What amazing plumage and camouflage!

2 days ago   ·  8
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Leticia HardinMy daughter thought that was a pic of a log! We both learned something new about this bird today. 🙂

2 days ago   ·  6

1 Reply

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Elizabeth AnnI thought this picture was of a wooden log in a box at first. It took a minute to realize it was a bird! What incredible camouflage!

1 day ago   ·  2
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Eleanor Sanders-EstesI’ve been looking at this picture for a full 5 minutes and still see a log. Pretty amazing!

2 days ago   ·  5
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Sarah Del BuonoLook at that amazing camouflage

2 days ago   ·  2
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Anne Garrett NicolaouThanks for the info! I had no idea!

1 day ago   ·  1
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Peggy MaskHaven’t seen a bird like this.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Leslie Burke HerrHuh.... learned something new.

1 day ago   ·  1
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Erik AndersenAwwwww cute Lil birb

6 hours ago   ·  1
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Fred GreensteinAmazing

2 days ago   ·  1
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Antonella Coretti FrenchI had no idea! Fascinating stuff! Shared! 🙂

2 days ago   ·  4
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Ellen HumphreyWow.

1 day ago   ·  1
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Laura MartinezSteve Estabrook

24 hours ago   ·  1
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Julie Anne WongChristina Fowler

1 day ago   ·  1
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Terri MeyerSay what!!!

2 hours ago
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We have only seen 3 Western Meadowlarks this year! This one was brought in after being caught by a cat. Its wounds were so severe, we had to help it eat for a couple of weeks, but as the wounds heal, it has been starting to eat on its own. ... See MoreSee Less

We have only seen 3 Western Meadowlarks this year! This one was brought in after being caught by a cat. Its wounds were so severe, we had to help it eat for a couple of weeks, but as the wounds heal, it has been starting to eat on its own.

Linda Norris, Kathey Norton and 23 others like this

Laura Jane RavenscraftYay!!! I have a few in my neighborhood!!! Watt and Whitney Aves. The song they sing is amazing...

3 days ago   ·  1
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Susan Galster PayneThey used to be everywhere. Miss their call

2 days ago   ·  1
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Cristina SilcocksThey have the most beautiful song🎶 www.birdnote.org/show/singing-meadowlarks

2 days ago   ·  1
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Michele Elaine FloresAdorable❤❤❤❤

2 days ago   ·  1
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